The Timucuan Indians were the first inhabitants of Hontoon Island. Snails gathered from the shallows of the St. Johns River were a staple food of these people. Through the years, the discarded shells accumulated to form the two large mounds we see today.
     A large owl totem and a frog/otter, carved by the Indians more then 600 years ago, was discovered nearby in 1955. A replica of this totem stands in the picnic area as a tribute to the artistry and craftsmanship of the extinct culture.
     In later years, the 1,650-acre island was a pioneer homestead, a boat yard, a center for commercial fishing and a cattle ranch before being purchased for use as a state park in 1967.
     The scenery of the island varies with the elevation. Pine Flatwoods occur on the higher areas, while palm/oak hammocks, cypress swamps and marshes border the St. Johns River and its tributaries. The abundant wildlife found here is as varied as the scenery and the seasons.

Hontoon Island is cared for by the Hontoon Island CSO.
Please visit their web site!

 

 

For more information on the evolution of this area please visit:
WEST VOLUSIA AND THE ST. JOHNS RIVER
- A 15,000-YEAR LOVE AFFAIR -

For more information about other state parks please visit:
The Planet DeLand Encounter's State Park Section

Other West Volusia State Parks:
Deleon Springs  I Blue Springs

 

 

 


- Welcome | Park Features | Highlights | Fee's & Rentals | Virtual Tour -       

Copyright 2000 - Tinker Graphics Design & Hosting by:
TINKER GRAPHICS

tink@planetusofa.com